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An 8-week civic education program targeting non-Hongkongers in Berlin who concern about the anti-extradition bill protests in Hong Kong. 8 discussion sessions will be held from mid-Sep on every Tuesday to explain the struggles and difficulties protesters have been facing from different perspectives, in order to deepen foreigners’ understanding of the ongoing protests and the long-existing social issues behind.

1. SEP 17: TO DO THE IMPOSSIBLE
2. SEP 24: THE “WECONNECT” SOLIDARITY
3. OCT 1: EMOTIONAL STRUGGLES BEHIND THE SCENES
4. OCT 8: POST MATERIALISM GENERATION
5. OCT 15: THE PRESS HAVE TAKEN THEIR SIDES
6. OCT 22: THE HYPOCRITICAL NEUTRALITY
7. OCT 29: THE LUCIFER EFFECT: THE ROLE OF POLICE IN A SOCIETY
8. NOV 5: LAST BUT NOT LEAST: CONCLUSIONS & PERSPECTIVES

The foundation of human rights is a right to have rights, as Hannah Arendt phrases it. The People’s Republic of China has grown to be the strongest totalitarian regime in the world since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. Despite its absolute attitude to dissenting voices inside and outside of the country, Hong Kong people have undertaken an act of civil disobedience to fight against their authoritarian government and the big brother behind. Many people are rather pessimistic about fighting this Goliath, saying the great power is impossible to defeat. However, Hong Kong is not a sole case in history.

The hardships of the civil movement in east-Germany and other Eastern bloc countries in 1989, as well as their fights for democracy and an oppression-free society, would never be forgotten. However, these are only something from history books to some people in Europe. While Germany is celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Hong Kong is still in dire straits, defending her last freedom amid blood, sweat and tears.

The anti-extradition bill protests in Hong Kong are sometimes too complex to understand lacking a clear cut-in point. This program will divide the protests into 7 smaller parts, which covers topics from police brutality to press neutrality. Participants can experience the dilemmas and inner struggles from different perspectives and feel what Hongkongers feel. It also aims at providing a platform for people from different parts of the world to communicate with each other and discuss solutions for the new global crisis, especially for those who share the same kind of frustration, anger and discouragement in facing injustice in different contexts.

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